This week, Aaron Martens discusses drop-shot techniques for late winter/early spring, pitching and flipping techniques and general tips for co-anglers interested in getting along with their pro partners.

If you are interested in participating in future columns, submit questions along with your full name and address via e-mail to askthepro@jacobsinteractive.com.

Q & A with AARON MARTENS

Q: How effective is a drop-shot technique in late winter/early spring? I would think this might be a good technique to try when the water temperature is in the mid 40s to low 50s. Also, when is perfect time is to use the drop-shot? – Marty Denney, Lexington, Ky.

A: Drop-shotting is very effective technique in late winter and early spring in deep lakes, but it can also be effective in shallow lakes at that time of year. Drop-shotting works best when fish are roaming and searching for food because the bait is off the bottom. Water temperature has never really been a factor for me in deciding when to use drop-shot.

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By his early teenage years, Aaron Martens had become enthralled with the idea of participating in bass tournaments and becoming a professional bass angler, which his mother Carol encouraged as his tournament partner during the 1980s and into the early 1990s. Together they teamed to win many tournaments across the West.

As his curiosity about the ways of the largemouth bass intensified, he studied In-Fisherman magazine and was influenced by In-Fisherman’s mantra of “Fish+Location+Presentation=Success.” In-Fisherman’s multispecies approach to angling, as well as its emphasis on versatility, left an indelible mark on Martens’ psyche, allowing him to boldly try such unorthodox lures as ice jigs and tiny crappie baits for bass.

Normally, Martens doesn’t let journalists witness his practice session; but at the CITGO Bassmaster Pro Tour event at Table Rock Lake in Missouri, he made an exception to that rule, allowing me to observe his every move and report lure choices, presentations, and locations he plied along the reservoir’s 857 miles of shoreline last March.

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